“True Bud: Understanding Toxic Marijuana Syndrome” by Scott Gillet

TrueBudTRUE BUD: UNDERSTANDING TOXIC MARIJUANA SYNDROME

Scott Gillet, LCSW; CRNC
BIRD (2015)
ISBN 9780578173764
Reviewed by Paige Lovitt for Reader Views (06/17)

Marijuana has generally been viewed as a benign drug in our culture. As it becomes legalized in more states, it will also become more acceptable to use openly in social situations. The information presented in “True Bud: Understanding Toxic Marijuana Syndrome” by Scott Gillet, makes the future for today’s youth to be very scary. While the author points out the good and bad uses for marijuana, he focuses on the fact that Toxic Marijuana Syndrome is a reality that is often ignored. When our youth, whose brains are undergoing critical phases of development, begin using marijuana, they hinder their development both psychologically and physically. This can have an impact on memory, learning and impulse control.

Toxic Marijuana Syndrome is more prevalent today because marijuana is bred with higher levels of THC; much of it is laced with other drugs and pesticides; and it is being used in ways that introduce other chemicals into our lungs. The form in which the marijuana is used can have a serious effect on one’s health. If it is a dab, the recipient takes high levels of THC (80%) into their bodies and is also at risk of inhaling butane and heated toxic metals. The information presented here is so scary to me, because many people think that it is a natural drug. It is also widely believed that it is not addictive, but both the author and I have seen otherwise. I went through my late teens to middle-age watching people become “stuck and stupid.” It is frustrating to see people who once had motivation become more focused on being stoned and talking about all of the things that they are going to do some day.

“True Bud” further supports my belief that marijuana can be dangerously addictive and toxic to the body. The author mentions that THC takes longer to leave the brain than heroin. How scary is that?

This book presents a great deal of resources where information was derived. The author is also the founder of BIRD- the Briarcliff Institute for Recovery and Development. Through his practice there, he works with a lot of teens that have Toxic Marijuana Syndrome. He follows several protocols to help them, which address all aspects of the person’s life, including nutrient deficiencies caused by excessive marijuana use. They also work with helping teens who are using marijuana as coping mechanisms because this does not help them resolve their problems.

Two things really hit me hard when I read this book. The first is that with the legalization of marijuana, gangs will have to find other ways to keep the money coming in. The solution for them would be to create a product that will be either very high in THC or laced with other dangerous drugs. The second thing that stood out is that the author tells parents that if you use marijuana, your kids will know where you keep it. This is so true. I remember going to school with kids who were hitting their parent’s stash. We need to be aware that our youth pay more attention than we realize!

The whole focus of “True Bud: Understanding Toxic Marijuana Syndrome” by Scott Gillet is not all about the negative aspects of marijuana use. The author points out that it has been of benefit to people with health issues. However, for it to be of benefit, it is extremely important that the quality of the plant be controlled so that people who have health issues will not be ingesting toxins from pesticides and dirty soil into their bodies. This book is a must read for parents, counselors and therapists!

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Reader Views is an Austin, Texas, based company. We started late December 2005 as a book review service. Shortly after the company's birth we expanded into offering a variety of services for authors such as book publicity services, editing, author interviews, literary book awards, as well as coaching to write book proposals.
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