“Such Splendid Prisons” by Harvey Solomon

In “Such Splendid Prisons,” Harvey Solomon takes us into the worlds of five Axis diplomats who were detained by the United States during World War II. It tells an eye-opening story about a period of time in the history of the United States where seemingly innocent individuals had their freedoms taken away. … More “Such Splendid Prisons” by Harvey Solomon

“The Mystery of Barbara Fritchie: A True Patriot” by Tamara Louise Thayer

Tamara Louise Thayer tells the story of a true patriot in “The Mystery of Barbara Fritchie.” Born in 1766, Barbara Fritchie led a full and meaningful life for 96 years. She appeared to be an intelligent woman who was friends with some notable historical figures from the Civil War era, including George Washington and Frances Scott Key. The mystery that surrounds her, actually had been caused by a bit of a scandal during her time. … More “The Mystery of Barbara Fritchie: A True Patriot” by Tamara Louise Thayer

Finding St. Lo by Ted Neill

“Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family” is a story from World War II, told by Robert Lewis Fowler and Gordon Edward Cross. They are a soldier and a medic, respectively, who served alongside each other in the 134th US Army Regiment. In this book, Fowler’s grandson Ted Neill collects their journal entries together into one cohesive format, alongside essays of his own. … More Finding St. Lo by Ted Neill

46 Union Street: The Untold Story of Rho Upsilon by Bruce Kesselman

“46 Union Street: The Untold Story of Rho Upsilon,” edited by Bruce A. Kesselman, is the history of the Rutgers Chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi, Rho Upsilon. The fraternity was established for Jewish college men, but open to anyone committed to the mission. … More 46 Union Street: The Untold Story of Rho Upsilon by Bruce Kesselman

Darwin’s Second Voyage by John Dahl

For five dedicated years Charles Darwin traveled throughout South America in the 1800’s. His now famous travel to the Galapagos Islands is well-known to many in the scientific community, as well as many people at large. The five years that he traveled on a ship called “The Beagle” was the last trip he had taken during his life. He returned to England and wrote extensively about what he learned on his odyssey. But imagine if Darwin could have made a second trip, not just to South America again but maybe some other locale? What else could he have possibly observed and learned about the world? Would he have concluded something else as important as natural selection? … More Darwin’s Second Voyage by John Dahl