Ockham’s Razor: A Novel by Alan Michael Williams

Ockham’s Razor: A Novel
Alan Michael Williams
BookSurge (2009)
ISBN 9781439235270
Reviewed by Carol Hoyer, PhD, for Reader Views (10/09)

 

From the very first page author Williams has captivated his reading audience by describing vividly his two main characters, Brendan and Micah. Both young men know that their sexuality is in question and are afraid to talk about it.  Being brought up Mormon has its good and bad points and when it comes to one’s sexuality or being of color, those are some things one doesn’t discuss.

Micah, a few years older than Brendan, has left the Church as he doesn’t agree with some of the doctrine and thinking.  Brendan has left the Church as well, but has not discussed his homosexuality with many people; his concern is that he loves dance- ballet and pointe, and no one can understand why a man would do this. He questions his own faith, as does Micah.  What starts out as a friendship grows into an on-again, off-again, relationship after Brendan lets Micah read his journal about his sexual attraction toward him.

During the course of trying to take the relationship slowly, Micah finds he can’t control his feelings or desire. Brendan on the other hand is often negative and critical of Micah, but at the same time initiates romantic and intimate interludes. Their relationship is strenuous to say the least.

I would say that the major theme of “Ockham’s Razor” by Alan Michael Williams as I read it was about the Church and homosexuality.  The author, who was an active Mormon at one time, gives readers good information about the Church’s stance on homosexuality.  The narrative of the story is given from Micah’s point of view with many conversations about pitfalls of the relationship, and who gives more in the relationship.  I found that I wanted to look more into what the Mormons believed about homosexuality and people of color in the church. It was a fast read.

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